Canadian Institue Of Planners

Shaping our Communities
Sustaining Canada's Future.

Dr. Mohammad A. Qadeer FCIP

 
Dr.
Mohammad Qadeer is by definition an immigrant (foreign-born) who now has lived and served in Canada far longer than the majority of born-Canadians. He taught Urban and Regional Planning at Queen's University full time for 29 years and now has been teaching part time, post retirement for another 15years. So there are probably senior professional planners in almost all major cities of Canada who would be acquainted with his academic quirks, as the Queen's more than 1000 alumni have spread throughout Canada. Mohammad was among the founding faculty of the school. His years as the director of the school were some of the most satisfying time of his career, largely made fulfilling by very co-operative, dedicated and creative colleagues, students and staff.
Mohammad served as an Associate editor of Plan Canada in the days the journal was edited at Queen's. Over the years he served on committees and organizing teams of CIP and OPPI for conferences. He served as a consultant, advisor and researchers for the  UN, UNDP, CMHC, Ontario Ministries and many Eastern Ontario townships and Pakistan's Ministries of Planning and Housing and Environment. His academic interests and skills spanned both Canadian and International issues. He believes in the necessity of understanding the cultural context for planning practice. Thus he chose to limit most of his international work to Pakistan. He has written extensively about urban development in Pakistan (his home land) as well as planning policies, land and real estate development and multicultural planning in Canada. One of his article on Planning for multicultural cities in Canada received Honorable Mention for Best Article by the American Planning Journal. He has expressed his gratitude to the two countries that have shaped his life, Canada and Pakistan, by publishing books alternatively on each country.  On retirement from full time teaching, he moved to Toronto to pursue his interest of learning about the functioning of multicultural cities. He follows a circuit of ethnic greasy spoon restaurants where he hangs out for his observations.